Clifford Manlove, Ph.D.

Penn State Mark
Associate Professor, English
Office Phone
Office Location
Main Building, 202
Penn State Greater Allegheny, 4000 University Drive, McKeesport, PA 15132
    Biography

    Fall 2021

    On-Campus Office Hours
    Tuesdays:  12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
    Thursdays:  12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

    Virtual Office Hours via Zoom
    Wednesdays:  1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
    ZOOM URL:  https://psu.zoom.us/j/91567049640


    Clifford Manlove is an Associate Professor of English in his 21st year at Penn State Greater Allegheny. His research focuses on postcolonial studies, and twentieth-century literature and film. After earning his PhD in 20th-century literature and critical theory from the University of Missouri, Dr. Manlove came to PSUGA in the Fall of 2001. He teaches composition and professional writing, creative writing, professional editing, 20th-century world literature and film theory, and postcolonial studies centered on the transatlantic basin (Britain, West Africa, Caribbean [especially reggae & Rastafarian culture], and American South). Dr. Manlove served as Adviser & Publisher for the campus review of literary & and visual arts, ABSENCE, from 2002-2018. He is an active researcher of the literary and film topics that he teaches, and has published articles in several scholarly, peer-reviewed journals, among them: The South Atlantic Review, the Minnesota Review, College Literature, Left Curve, (Re-)turn: A Journal of Lacanian Studies, and Cinema Journal. Since 2012, he published 4 book chapters: One on Peter Jackson’s King Kong in a collection, Hollywood’s Africa Since 1994 (Ohio UP; edited by MaryEllen Higgins); a second on Tarantino’s Django Unchained and the original Django by Sergio Corbucci for a book on the “international” western (Routledge); thirdly, on Aldous Huxley’s use of evolutionary theory in Brave New World in The Individual & Utopia (Ashgate; edited by Cameron Ellis & Clint Jones); and, fourthly, an interpretation of the roles of power and family in George Orwell’s 1984 in a Critical Insights volume on the novel (edited by Thomas Horan). Dr. Manlove is finishing a book on the first Jamaican feature film ever made, “The Harder They Came: Reading Representations of Rudies, Rastafari, and Reggae in Jamaica’s First Feature Film.”

    Teaching Interests:
    Postcolonial Studies, Film History & Theory, 20th-Century Literature, Slave Narratives

    Area(s) of Expertise:
    Postcolonial Studies, Film History & Theory, 20th-Century Literature, Slave Narratives

    Research, Professional or Personal Interests:
    Reggae music, Rastafarian culture, cross-cultural theories of anarchism.

    Research Interests

    Reggae music and culture, Rastafari, Westerns & Spaghetti Westerns, Slave narratives

    Publications

    “The Harder They Came: Cultural and Political Histories of Rastafari and Reggae in Jamaica’s First Feature Film.” (Book manuscript in progress.)

    “‘We are Different from All the Oligarchies of the Past’: On Power and the Primal Family in Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four” in “Critical Approaches to George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four.” Ed. Thomas Horan. New York: Salem P., 2016. 128-139.

    “From Django to Django Unchained—Love Narratives in the Global South” in The Western in the Global South. Routledge Advances in Film Studies ser. Ed. MaryEllen Higgins, Rita Keresztesi, and Dana Oscherwitz. New York: Routledge, 2015. 60-78.

    “‘Between the Utopian and the Primitive Horns of His Dilemma’: Aldous Huxley’s Selection of Peter Kropotkin over T. H. Huxley for the Savage’s ‘Third Alternative’ in Brave New World” in The Individual and Utopia: A Multidisciplinary Study of Humanity and Perfection. Ed. Cameron Ellis and Clint Jones. Burlington: Ashgate, 2015. 67-83.

    Presentations:
    "Tarantino’s Use of Horror Genre Aesthetics to Represent and Re-Present Chattel Slavery in Django Unchained" presented at the Mid-Atlantic Popular and American Culture Association Annual Conference via ZOOM. 13 November 2021.

    "Cowboys and Zombies: Representing White Supremacy in Sergio Corbucci’s Django (1966)" presented at the Mid-Atlantic Popular and American Culture Association Annual Conference. Pittsburgh, PA, 8 November 2019. [paper nominated for Best Paper Presentation Award.]

    "Slavocracy and Slavtopia: The Utopian Aims of the American Slave Dystopia," presennted at The Society for Utopian Studies Annual Conference, Memphis, TN. 10 November 2017.

    “Defining Citizenship and Civic Legitimacy: The Roots of ‘Birtherism,’ ‘Nativism,’ and ‘Birthright Citizenship’ in the American Slave State,” presented at the National Communication Association Annual Conference, Philadelphia, PA, 12 November 2016.

    “Critical Approaches to George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four,” presented at the Society for Utopian Studies Annual Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, 7 November 2015.

    Education

    Drake University (Des Moines, IA), B.A. English, 1988

    University of New Hampshire (Durham, NH), M.A. English, 1990

    University of Missouri (Columbia, MO), Ph.D. English, 1991

    Papers and Presentations

    "Cowboys and Zombies: Representing White Supremacy in Sergio Corbucci’s Django (1966)." Mid-Atlantic American and Popular Studies Association Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, November, 2019. [Nominated for the Anderson Award for best paper presentation.]

    “Defining Citizenship and Civic Legitimacy: The Roots of ‘Birtherism,’ ‘Nativism,’ and ‘Birthright Citizenship’ in the American Slave State,” presented at the National Communication Association Annual Conference, Philadelphia, PA, 12 November 2016.

    “Critical Approaches to George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four,” presented at the Society for Utopian Studies Annual Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, 7 November 2015.

    “Analysis of the Tropes of ‘Babylon’ and ‘Zion’ in the Reggae Soundtrack to The Harder They Come (1972): On the place of Utopia and Dystopia in Rastafari,” presented at the Society for Utopian Studies Annual Conference, Montreal, Canada, 24 October 2014.

    “The Utopian and Dystopian Dimensions of the Plantation as Represented in Tarantino’s Django Unchained (2012) and the ‘Southern’ version of the (Anti-)Western,” presented at the Society for Utopian Studies Annual Conference, Charleston, SC, 16 November 2013.